copyright © 2014 and Beyond
The Sonnet A brief History and Description Throughout history, the sonnet has been one of the most used and best loved poetic forms. The term ”sonnet” derives from the Provenal word ”sonet”and the Italian word “\”sonetto,”both meaning ”little song.” There are several different rhyme schemes and other poetic conventions associated with the sonnet, but the one standard that all sonnets possess is their length of 14 lines. The sonnet is so popular that “Sonnet Studies”(or “Sonnetology) is actually a branch of literary criticism.  Those who write sonnets are known as “Sonneteers,”and the act of writing a sonnet is called “Sonnetizing.” Giacomo da Lentini, an Italian poet of the 13th century, is thought to be the inventor of the sonnet, but Francesco Petrarca,(anglicized as Petrarch) in the 14th century, became the most famous early sonneteer, and his style of sonnet became known as the Petrarchan Sonnet. The English Renaissance was a hotbed of sonnet activity. William Shakespeare, although best known for his plays, wrote 154 sonnets and because of his fame, his style of sonnet (the Shakesperean Sonnet) is often considered the “standard”for the English language, but it is by no means the only acceptable style. AmeÕ de la Coeur, a contemporary of Shakespeare, wrote many sonnets and took liberties with the form*.  She was a minor poet of the time, but has experienced a resurgence of her work, and it has become especially popular at Renaissance Festivals today. Famous sonneteers, since Shakespear, include Keats, Shelley, Elizabeth Barret Browning, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, E. E. Cummings and William Butler Yeats. *This statement is an example of “poetic license.”
Single/Multiple
Single/Multiple
Sonnets on Printed Scrolls Sonnets are 5.5 x 8.5 inches, They can be cut to fit standard 5 x 7 inch frame.
Fancy Sonnet
Unadorned Sonnet
Unadorned Sonnet
Fancy Sonnet
copyright © 2014 and Beyond
The Sonnet A brief History and Description Throughout history, the sonnet has been one of the most used and best loved poetic forms. The term ”sonnet” derives from the Provenal word ”sonet”and the Italian word “\”sonetto,”both meaning ”little song.” There are several different rhyme schemes and other poetic conventions associated with the sonnet, but the one standard that all sonnets possess is their length of 14 lines. The sonnet is so popular that “Sonnet Studies”(or “Sonnetology) is actually a branch of literary criticism.  Those who write sonnets are known as “Sonneteers,”and the act of writing a sonnet is called “Sonnetizing.” Giacomo da Lentini, an Italian poet of the 13th century, is thought to be the inventor of the sonnet, but Francesco Petrarca,(anglicized as Petrarch) in the 14th century, became the most famous early sonneteer, and his style of sonnet became known as the Petrarchan Sonnet. The English Renaissance was a hotbed of sonnet activity. William Shakespeare, although best known for his plays, wrote 154 sonnets and because of his fame, his style of sonnet (the Shakesperean Sonnet) is often considered the “standard”for the English language, but it is by no means the only acceptable style. AmeÕ de la Coeur, a contemporary of Shakespeare, wrote many sonnets and took liberties with the form*.  She was a minor poet of the time, but has experienced a resurgence of her work, and it has become especially popular at Renaissance Festivals today. Famous sonneteers, since Shakespear, include Keats, Shelley, Elizabeth Barret Browning, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, E. E. Cummings and William Butler Yeats. *This statement is an example of “poetic license.”
Single/Multiple
Single/Multiple
Sonnets on Printed Scrolls Sonnets are 5.5 x 8.5 inches, They can be cut to fit standard 5 x 7 inch frame.
Unadorned Sonnet